How We Talk About Weddings

How We Talk About Weddings

How We Talk About Weddings

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The right language to use when we talk about weddings. Photo by  Nick Karvounis  on  Unsplash

The right language to use when we talk about weddings. Photo by Nick Karvounis on Unsplash

This blog post has been stewing in my brain for a while now. It’s mostly for my fellow wedding professionals but it’s also just good food for thought. 

I’m just gonna put it out there: It’s time to stop using the word “bridal.” Unless you’re actually selling products to or working exclusively with brides, the word bridal is done. I cringe when I hear it. Using “bride and groom” to describe your clients in a general way is no longer acceptable. Of course, if the couple you’re describing is actually an opposite-sex couple then by all means use the term bride and groom. How we talk about weddings matters. 

Words to stop using : fiancé, fianceé, husband, wife, bride, groom, bridal, bridesmaids, groomsmen, bridal show

My goal has always been to be as inclusive as I can, and that means being really careful about how I talk about weddings. I mean, some weddings don’t even have a  bride! It’s not that hard. Try using these words to describe the people you work with when you’r’e referring to them generally. 

Words to use instead: sweetheart, beloved, betrothed, spouse, mate, partner, couples, clients, wedding party, attendants, wedding show

I don’t want to offend anyone, but I feel like it’s time for us in the wedding industry to start being more careful about how we talk. I perform weddings for all couples in love and I certainly don’t want to exclude anyone by using outdated language. 

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